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Archive for April, 2009

NABI and Presidents’ Forum Comments; Top 7 Things to Know

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It is likely that all beer, wine and spirits labels will change dramatically in the near future. TTB has been working on new rules since CSPI and other groups submitted a petition in 2003. The new rules would require a “Serving Facts” panel on every container. This panel would include a lot more information, such as the typical serving size, number of servings per container, calories, carbohydrates, protein and fat. Because this is a big, controversial change, TTB has received more than 18,000 public comments during the past few years. There are far too many comments for most people to review, and so we will highlight and summarize the most noteworthy comments here. The most recent proposal and comments are here. This is comment 18 in a series; to see others, click on the “serving facts” tag below.

NABI is the National Association of Beverage Importers. It is a trade association whose members produce, import and distribute alcohol beverage products. Its three page comment said:

  1. The manner of presenting the information should be optional and depend on the space available.
  2. For example, a linear format may be suitable in some cases and in others the company could provide the information via a website.
  3. The rule is complex especially in combination with state and international rules, and allergen labeling.

The Presidents’ Forum of the Beverage Alcohol Industry is a trade association made up of US alcohol beverage company CEOs. Its two page comment said:

  1. This should be voluntary rather than mandatory.
  2. A toll free phone number or website could serve the same purpose.
  3. Or, a linear format is sufficient.
  4. As companies phase-in the serving facts panel, they should be allowed to do so without seeking new label approvals. This would ease the burden on industry and “reduce the need to review a vast number of already approved labels that no doubt would strain [TTB's] already scarce resources.”

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For . . . Women Only

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For Girls Chicks Women Only.

Yes; it is difficult to imagine a male sipping this, with a straight face. Chick Food watermelon schnapps (above) is also available as pomegranate schnapps. The products are made by Side Pocket Foods of Cottage Grove, Oregon.

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liqueur


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Sin City Libations

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Sin City seems to be alive and well in the hearts and minds of drinkers and marketers everywhere. Sin City Whiskey (above) is imported by Side Pocket Foods of Oregon. Viva Las Vegas is a California white wine bottled by Cartlidge & Browne Winery of American Canyon, California.

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whisky, wine


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Whipahol

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Good idea. A 38 proof spirit in a ReddiWhip can. Somebody should have done it a long time ago. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that:

two Atlanta inventors are getting ready to release a product they think will forever change the world of silly cocktails as we know it. … So original and so potentially game-changing is this creamy newcomer that the inventors had to invent a word for it. … It is a beautiful word, a portmanteau of the highest order, and it tells you all you need to know: Whipahol!

Because of a state law that prevents bars from selling liquor from containers smaller than 750 ml, the Whipped Lightning boys have yet to get a Georgia distributor. So they’re beginning with distribution deals in neighboring states and are working toward getting a Georgia waiver.

Maple Grove Products … is the only producer of distilled spirits in the state of Georgia, according to David Dyal at the Georgia Department of Revenue.

This is what happens you combine alcohol, cream, a lawyer, and Devo (“It’s not too late. To whip it. Whip it good.”).

November 30, 2010 Updatehere is a good CNBC clip on Whipahol, from yesterday. It is hard to believe that this light and frothy product can be portrayed as something sinister, and whipped up into the next “controversy in a can.”

December 8, 2010 Update:  the whipped booze products get so very much attention (including our extensive on-air interview with CBS radio) that TTB issues a statement, to explain how such products are regulated.

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distilled spirits specialty


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Reps. Thompson and Radanovich Comment; Top 5 Things to Know

caucus

It is likely that all beer, wine and spirits labels will change dramatically in the near future. TTB has been working on new rules since CSPI and other groups submitted a petition in 2003. The new rules would require a “Serving Facts” panel on every container. This panel would include a lot more information, such as the typical serving size, number of servings per container, calories, carbohydrates, protein and fat. Because this is a big, controversial change, TTB has received more than 18,000 public comments during the past few years. There are far too many comments for most people to review, and so we will highlight and summarize the most noteworthy comments here. The most recent proposal and comments are here. This is comment 17 in a series; to see others, click on the “serving facts” tag below.

Representatives Mike Thompson (D-CA 1st) and George Radanovich (R-Mariposa) are co-chairmen of the Congressional Wine Caucus. Their 2-page comment said:

  1. This rule “could lead to the most significant revisions in wine label requirements in the history of the American wine industry.”
  2. It could “have a severely detrimental impact on the wine industry.”
  3. There is little evidence that consumers want or need additional information of this type, and TTB should balance this against the burden.
  4. TTB should make it voluntary, or allow the use of typical values rather than analytical values.
  5. The burdens are unreasonable. They could “easily reach into the hundreds of thousands of dollars for a medium sized winery.”

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alcohol beverages generally


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