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Archive for April, 2010

Cowboy Milk Liquor

After seeing this vodka distilled from cow’s milk, we didn’t expect to see too many more beverages distilled from milk. Despite all, here is Chinese Milk Liquor. The label is fairly sketchy about how it’s made. A very good website, teaching about Asian alcohol beverages, explains that this type of spirit is called Lai Jiu:

Literally “milk liquor,” it is made by taking cow’s milk, fermenting it, and distilling it. It is around 40% alcohol and it is as clear as water. I absolutely love the stuff. It has a sweet after-taste to it, like evaporated milk … . It gives one such a lovely high (much better than bai jiu). To my knowledge (and I’ve looked), it can ONLY be found in the province of China called Nei Meng Gu (Inner Mongolia).

The same website also covers Bok Bun Ja Ju (“man who pees in a pot”) but we’ll leave that topic for another day.

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distilled spirits specialty, fruit wine


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Buck Bunnies and Spirits

The Buck Bunny didn’t get very far. It stopped not far from this 2006 approval. Maybe the antlers, or the spirits, or J├Ągermeister got in the way.

A contributor in California was concerned about the spirits added to this product, and the overall appearance. He said:

It seems legally interesting because it seems to contradict the TTB labeling code about wines containing distilled spirits and being similar to distilled spirits. Maybe those rules don’t apply to flavored wines. Also, it reminds me of a Jackelope.

Quite possibly, it also reminded Peach Street Distillers of a Jackelope. Peach Street rolled out their Jackelope Gin about a year later.

The spirits are probably a minor problem, compared to the other issues noted above. It is common to add spirits to wine. It is less common to mention them, but it is usually required, when those spirits are not derived from the same fruit as the base wine. Here it is grape wine with citrus spirits. If it were grape wine with grape brandy, the spirits would be less likely to show on the label.

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wine specialty


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Amerique Absinthe

This absinthe label does a good job explaining the recent history about absinthe. It explains that absinthe was banned from 1912 until almost 100 years later. More of the story about legalization is here, and the the first 20 or so products approved for US sale are listed here.

Amerique 1912 is distilled by Great Lakes Distillery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It is also one of the few absinthes that states “thujone free” on the bottle.

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absinthe


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Lithuanian Beer Goggles

This is Before-After Beer, produced by Rinkuskiai beer company of Lithuania. It is imported by Aiko Importers of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. With a little help from Rinkuskiai, the old man metamorphosizes into the young woman, providing further evidence for this and this theory.

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malt beverage


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Good Flags and Bad Flags

In many situations, TTB will not allow national flags, and especially not the US flag. The regulations support this. So the above labels seem to be noteworthy exceptions.

Maize Valley Winery’s Redneck Red wine shows The American Flag on the main label, alongside The Confederate Flag.

In the second example, The American Flag appears with the Military Flag of Japan. The wine is made by D’Vine Wine of Fredricksburg, Texas. A notable instance where TTB did not allow the US flag is on this New Hampshire beer.

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wine


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