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Archive for May, 2011

Garlic Wine

This post will start short but is likely to grow long over time. Very long. We will try to show the enormous range of foodstuffs from which wine is produced. With each post we will add to the list, and I predict it will grow way past 50 60. Today we add Garlic wine to the list.

  1. Agave wine
  2. Apple wine
  3. Apricot wine
  4. Aronia berry wine
  5. Avocado wine
  6. Banana wine
  7. Blackberry wine
  8. Blueberry wine
  9. Buffaloberry wine
  10. Cantaloupe wine
  11. Cherry wine
  12. Cranberry wine
  13. Dandelion wine
  14. Elderberry wine
  15. Elder flower wine
  16. Fig wine
  17. Garlic wine. Made by Long Trout Winery of Auburn, Pennsylvania. The second example is garlic cooking wine.
  18. Gooseberry wine
  19. Grape wine
  20. Hibiscus wine
  21. Huckleberry wine
  22. Jasmine fruit wine
  23. Kiwi wine
  24. Linden flower wine
  25. Lingonberry
  26. Lychee wine
  27. Maple Wine
  28. Mango wine
  29. Mangosteen wine
  30. Marionberry wine
  31. Onion wine
  32. Peach wine
  33. Pear wine
  34. Pepper wine
  35. Persimmon wine
  36. Pineapple wine
  37. Pomegranate wine
  38. Rhubarb wine
  39. Strawberry wine
  40. Tomato wine
  41. Watermelon wine

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agricultural wine, fruit wine


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Napa Vodka

It doesn’t go quite as far as Roth Vodka, which mentions something like a vintage date. But in some ways, Napa Vodka goes further — because it refers to the specific grape varietal and the vaunted Napa origin — rather than just California more generally.

Wines & Vines explains:

The vodka was made from 2008 grapes harvested from a single vineyard in Napa Valley and fermented into wine, then distilled in a Vendome copper pot still at Stillwater Spirits in Petaluma, Calif. … It takes nearly 2 tons of grapes to produce the 3,000 gallons of wine needed to make 300 gallons of high-proof spirits, which are then diluted to 500 gallons. … While there appears to be no legal requirement, [owner Arthur] Hartunian secured approval from the Napa Valley Vintners and Napa Valley Grapegrowers for his project.

It sells for about $75 per bottle, and the Napa, California distillery produced only about 2,600 bottles.

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vodka


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Cane Vodka

I bet more than 95% of vodka (consumed in the US) is distilled from grain. After all, the big ones like Stolichnaya, Absolut, Smirnoff, and Grey Goose all seem to be distilled from grain. Here is a notable exception, however. This vodka, made by Island Distillers, of Honolulu, Hawaii, is distilled from sugar cane. Another exception, cutting against the grain, is Glacier vodka, distilled from potatoes.

Does the commodity matter much? After all, vodka is supposed to be “neutral.” The rule says: “‘Vodka’ is neutral spirits so distilled, or so treated after distillation with charcoal or other materials, as to be without distinctive character, aroma, taste, or color.”

It is amazing that the regulations insist upon fastidious disclosure as to the commodity from which distilled when it’s not clear that it has any impact on the taste or quality. Possibly, it’s crucial to put it on the label because it’s not otherwise discernible. In any event, there is probably no doubt that it costs many times more to make neutral spirits from cane, potatoes or just about anything else compared to a tanker full of grain neutral spirits.

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vodka


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Maple Wine

This post will start short but is likely to grow long over time. Very long. We will try to show the enormous range of foodstuffs from which wine is produced. With each post we will add to the list, and I predict it will grow way past 50 60. Today we add Maple wine to the list.

  1. Agave wine
  2. Apple wine
  3. Apricot wine
  4. Aronia berry wine
  5. Avocado wine
  6. Banana wine
  7. Blackberry wine
  8. Blueberry wine
  9. Buffaloberry wine
  10. Cantaloupe wine
  11. Cherry wine
  12. Cranberry wine
  13. Dandelion wine
  14. Elderberry wine
  15. Elder flower wine
  16. Fig wine
  17. Gooseberry wine
  18. Grape wine
  19. Hibiscus wine
  20. Huckleberry wine
  21. Jasmine fruit wine
  22. Kiwi wine
  23. Linden flower wine
  24. Lingonberry
  25. Lychee wine
  26. Maple Wine. Made by Tree Spirits, of Oakland, Maine. Tree also makes spirits distilled from maple syrup.
  27. Mango wine
  28. Mangosteen wine
  29. Marionberry wine
  30. Onion wine
  31. Peach wine
  32. Pear wine
  33. Pepper wine
  34. Persimmon wine
  35. Pineapple wine
  36. Pomegranate wine
  37. Rhubarb wine
  38. Strawberry wine
  39. Tomato wine
  40. Watermelon wine

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fruit wine


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Streamlining COLAs?

It may be safe to put away that gnarly old ruler, from fifth grade. A few days ago, TTB announced that it will ease up on scrutinizing your cpi’s and mm’s. At first this sounds like a good thing, and the “streamlining” as described — because many are the frustrations about waiting on a coveted COLA — only to find it lying in the tatters of rejection, because of a few letters too big or too small.

Industry Circular 2011-04 says:

(TTB) will no longer examine labels to determine whether the images included in the applications meet the type size, characters per inch, and contrasting background requirements.  As a result, TTB will no longer return applications for correction due to these issues.  However, TTB reserves the right to review and return applications for these reasons when it deems necessary.

In some ways this may be good, especially if it speeds up the system and makes TTB more efficient. But the main effect may be a shift of this not so trivial burden over to the applicant. There is no change to the various CFR rules requiring all your cpi’s and mm’s to be just right, and this Circular in no way mitigates that burden. In fact, TTB hastens to add:  “The responsible industry member has always been obligated to ensure proper labeling for their products. In order to remind industry members of their continued responsibility for compliance, TTB will now include a qualification statement on all COLAs consistent with the purpose of this circular.” A real-world and early example is here (see just below the signature). If you think it’s not fun to get a “needs correction” notice after a few weeks, saying a few letters are too small — compare it to the pain of being told the same after you shipped a few hundred thousand cases.

There is no shortage of changes at TTB in recent months. In addition to all the changes noted here and above, TTB also brought back (a somewhat more limited form of) label expedites a few days ago.

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Posted in:

alcohol beverages generally


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