Flower
Bevlog

Posts Tagged ‘non-liquid’

snoBaR Ice Cream

About two years ago we showed spirits in the form of whipped cream. Last year we showed spirits in the form of an ice pop (more commonly known as a popsicle).

Just last week we showed various chocolate wines, to underscore the movement toward “The Dessertification of Beverages.” Nathan added a comment, asking how long until a convergence between spirits and ice cream. Within the same week, TTB approved a line of ice cream products, with about as much alcohol content as a light beer. snoBaR is made by Brothers International Desserts, of Irvine, California. Brothers seems to be mainly an ice cream company, more than a spirits company. So far, Brothers has approvals for Pink Squirrel (with brandy and amaretto, as above), Grasshopper (with brandy and creme de menthe), and Brandy Alexander (with brandy and creme de cocoa). All of them are about 4% alc./vol. — a fair amount more than the rum raisin ice creams of an earlier era. Baskin-Robbins tends to suggest that their Rum Raisin is made with little if any rum, while Häagen-Dazs suggests that at least a little rum is used.

Tags:

, ,

Posted in:

distilled spirits specialty


Email This Post Email This Post     |    Print This Post Print This Post     |    


Alcohol Infused Whipped Cream

Whipahol must be doing well, because now along comes another “Alcohol Infused Whipped Cream.”

It apparently is packed in an aerosol can. The back label says “CREAM is completely shelf stable and DOES NOT need to be refrigerated even after use.” The qualifications suggest that TTB wanted to check out this claim. This is canned by Temperance Distilling Company in Temperance, Michigan. For other advances in things whipped, there is Pinnacle Whipped – Whipped Cream Flavored Vodka.

November 30, 2010 Updatehere is a good CNBC clip on Whipahol, from yesterday. It is hard to believe that this light and frothy product can be portrayed as something sinister, and whipped up into the next “controversy in a can.”

December 8, 2010 Update:  the whipped booze products get so very much attention (including our extensive on-air interview with CBS radio) that TTB issues a statement, to explain how such products are regulated.

Tags:

, , ,

Posted in:

flavored vodka


Email This Post Email This Post     |    Print This Post Print This Post     |    


Liquor Sicle

This Liquor Sicle label features a prominent reference to “Liquor.” This has become rare. Where did the term come from, and where did it go?

The Online Etymology Dictionary defines “liquor” this way:

early 13c., likur “any matter in a liquid state,” from O.Fr. licour, from L. liquorem (nom. liquor) “liquid, liquidity,” from liquere “be fluid.” Sense of “fermented or distilled drink” (especially wine) first recorded c.1300. To liquor up “get drunk” is from 1845.

It is semi-ironic that this term is being applied to one of the few TTB products that is not intended to be consumed in a “liquid state.” From way back in 1892, here is a court struggling with the term, and trying to find the distinction between beer and liquor.

In a further irony, the term is probably used more commonly, these days, on malt beverages (such as Colt 45) compared to distilled spirits. “Malt liquor” goes back to at least 1937, and Alvin Gluek secured a patent on it in 1948.

Tags:

, ,

Posted in:

alcohol beverages generally, malt beverage


Email This Post Email This Post     |    Print This Post Print This Post     |    


TTB Not OK with Vitamin Wine

nrg

Controversy in a cup. This little shooter raises a lot of TTB issues. First of all, it’s a gel-shot and those can be controversial from time to time. Next, it is technically a wine but it has added spirits — in the form of citrus neutral spirits (vodka, for all intents and purposes) and flavors. But wait, there’s more. It contains caffeine. It contains taurine. And … it contains added vitamins, in the form of Vitamin B6 and B12 (pyridoxine and cyanocobalamin).

Not too surprisingly, this 2006 gem of an approval is also “surrendered” (see about halfway down the form).

As of this writing, TTB does not allow vitamins to be directly added to beer, wine or spirits. Until recent months, TTB allowed vitamins to be added so long as their was no direct reference to the vitamins on the label or in advertising. TTB is at the early stages of developing regulations related to alcohol beverages containing vitamins, minerals and caffeine.

Tags:

, , , , ,

Posted in:

wine specialty


Email This Post Email This Post     |    Print This Post Print This Post     |    


Whipahol

Click for COLA

Good idea. A 38 proof spirit in a ReddiWhip can. Somebody should have done it a long time ago. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that:

two Atlanta inventors are getting ready to release a product they think will forever change the world of silly cocktails as we know it. … So original and so potentially game-changing is this creamy newcomer that the inventors had to invent a word for it. … It is a beautiful word, a portmanteau of the highest order, and it tells you all you need to know: Whipahol!

Because of a state law that prevents bars from selling liquor from containers smaller than 750 ml, the Whipped Lightning boys have yet to get a Georgia distributor. So they’re beginning with distribution deals in neighboring states and are working toward getting a Georgia waiver.

Maple Grove Products … is the only producer of distilled spirits in the state of Georgia, according to David Dyal at the Georgia Department of Revenue.

This is what happens you combine alcohol, cream, a lawyer, and Devo (“It’s not too late. To whip it. Whip it good.”).

November 30, 2010 Updatehere is a good CNBC clip on Whipahol, from yesterday. It is hard to believe that this light and frothy product can be portrayed as something sinister, and whipped up into the next “controversy in a can.”

December 8, 2010 Update:  the whipped booze products get so very much attention (including our extensive on-air interview with CBS radio) that TTB issues a statement, to explain how such products are regulated.

Tags:

, ,

Posted in:

distilled spirits specialty


Email This Post Email This Post     |    Print This Post Print This Post     |    


Search Bevlog


Subscribe to the RSS feed

Get bevlog via email.
Delivered by FeedBurner